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Details about  RARE HALLMARK ANTIQUE OSTBY & BARTON AMETHYST 14K GOLD FILIGREE RING TITANIC

OSTBY PERISHED ON TITANIC 1912 ~OWN A PIECE OF HISTORY!

RARE HALLMARK ANTIQUE OSTBY & BARTON AMETHYST 14K GOLD FILIGREE RING TITANIC

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Item condition:
--not specified

EXTREMELY RARE RING IN GENTLY USED CONDITION. LIGHT WEAR ON STONE, STONE SITS A LITTLE CROOKED IN

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Ended:
Mar 16, 2014 17:17:22 EDT
Winning bid:
US $354.99
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Approximately C $392.78(including shipping)
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Coos Bay, Oregon, United States
 
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Item specifics

Seller Notes: EXTREMELY RARE RING IN GENTLY USED CONDITION. LIGHT WEAR ON STONE, STONE SITS A LITTLE CROOKED IN SETTING AS SHOWN IN PHOTOS. WOULD BENEFIT FROM A GOOD POLISH. PLEASE SEE PHOTOS AND READ ENTIRE AD.
Brand:

Ostby & Barton

Style:

Cocktail

Metal:

White Gold

Ring Size:

6.5

Metal Purity:

14k

Country/Region of Manufacture:

United States

Main Stone:

Amethyst

Country of Manufacture:

United States

Time and Again Deco Watches/Jewelry

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Up for bids is this stunning & rare Ostby & Barton solid 14k gold Fancy African Amethyst Filigree Ring. This is a really beautiful antique ring! This ring is in great condition, but it does show light wear which is to be expected on a ring this old and would benefit from a good polish. The deep purple Amethyst has been tested and is genuine mined from the earth stone. This amethyst came from Africa and is the finest Amethyst in the world! Rich velvety purple! It is approx. 3.5ct. The stone sits a little crooked, but is tight in setting. No damage to filigree. This can be seen in photos, they have been magnified to show detail.

This ring is hallmarked OB 14k with a Maltese Cross, which was the personal hallmark of Englehart Ostby which makes this a rare and very desirable ring. They just don't make them like this anymore! Very, very hard to find ring! All the work on this ring was done by hand and the workmanship speaks for itself. It weighs 2.2g. and is approx. a size 6.5. The ring is solid 14k white gold.

This is a rare find and a treasure indeed! Being Ostby & Barton... it is also a great investment! This would be a great addition to any OB collection. I purchased this with some other exceptionally rare OB items from an Ostby relative who had them stored in a safe for the past 120 years. Only rediscovered 2 years ago and has been in my safe ever since. Anyone interested in learning more about Ostby should read this:

<a href="http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html">Engelhart Cornelius Ostby Biography on Encyclopedia Titanica</a>

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Ostby

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

In addition to his jewellery business Østby was a director of the High Street Bank and the Industrial Trust Company, and a trustee of the Citizens Savings Bank; all of which were in Providence. Østby became well known in the city both for his success in business and for his many charitable acts.

Engelhart Østby was married to Lizzy Macy Webster (born 1854) on 7 June 1876 and they had four sons [1] and, on 30 November 1889, a daughter Helene Ragnhild.

Lizzie died on 26 November 1899, aged 45 and Engelhardt raised his youngest children with the help of his mother until her death on 5 December 1902 at the age of 76.

Østby often travelled to Europe to survey the European markets, particularly Paris, and he was always on the look out for developments in both production and design. Beginning in 1906 Engelhart took Helene with him on all his subsequent European business trips. They visited Norway for the first time in 1907, returning with a Norwegian Goats cheese - a family tradition which would be repeated in 1912. In the middle of January 1912 Engelhart travelled again to Europe, he needed a vacation, and again Helene accompanied him. They travelled around Southern Europe and Egypt and while at Nice, France they first heard about the possibility of returning to America on the Titanic. They journeyed on to Paris where they met Frank and Anna Warren whom they had previously met in Egypt. The Warrens already had their ticket for the Titanic.

Engelhart paid £62 for their tickets, according to White Star their last address was c/o Brown Shipley, Pall Mall, London SW. so perhaps they had also visited England. However, it was at the french port of Cherbourg that they boarded the Titanic in first class, Engelhart occupying cabin B-30 and Helene B-36. Engelhart carried with him his old doctor's bag he always used when travelling. In it he had gems, precious stones and other valuables that he had bought in Paris.

On the night of the disaster Engelhart and Helene sat in the reception room, they talked with Mr and Mrs Warren and listened to the orchestra. At around 10 p.m. Mr and Mrs Warren decided to take a stroll on deck but it was too cold so they all went to bed.

After the collision Engelhart met his daughter in the corridor that separated their staterooms. Together with the Warrens, they climbed the grand staircase to the Boat Deck. Leaving Helene and the others close to lifeboat 5 Engelhart returned to their staterooms to get some warmer clothes but in the meantime Helene had boarded the lifeboat and they never saw each other again.

Engelhart's body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#234).

NO. 234. - MALE. - ESTIMATED AGE, 52. - HAIR, FAIR.

EFFECTS - Gold filled teeth; gold watch and chain; knife: glasses; diary; two pocket books and papers.

FIRST CLASS. - NAME - ENGELHART C. OSTBY.

The embalmed body was identified in Halifax by an employee of Ostby & Barton, David Sutherland; he brought the coffin to Rhode Island and it was buried on 11 May 1912 (3 May?) at Swan Point, Providence. The paper Svea wrote on 15 May that: "The body was laid in a sealed metal coffin placed into a valuable mahogany coffin. The flower tribute was enormous, even when a note had been circulated not to send any flowers." When helen died in 1978 she was buried close to her father.


© Michael A.Findlay, USA

The family sought compensation from the White Star Line for their loss. Harold Ostby claimed 840,000 N.Kr. (Norwegian Kroner) for loss off life and Helene claimed 5,376 N.Kr. for loss of property, and 33,600 N.Kr. for loss of property and damage.

Engelhardt left a 14 page will bequeathing his estate to his children along with separate bequests to his brother Arthur, his sister Constance J. Coles of Brooklyn, NY and her daughter Elizabeth Coles. Some years later he added codicils to the will which revoked the bequests to Arthur Ostby and Elizabeth Coles but left intact his bequest of a homeplace in Brooklyn to his sister Constance. Present day descendants live in Providence, R.I., New Haven, Connecticut, and Garland, Texas.

http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.5HLfq22i.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.5HLfq22i.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.5HLfq22i.dpuf

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

In addition to his jewellery business Østby was a director of the High Street Bank and the Industrial Trust Company, and a trustee of the Citizens Savings Bank; all of which were in Providence. Østby became well known in the city both for his success in business and for his many charitable acts.

Engelhart Østby was married to Lizzy Macy Webster (born 1854) on 7 June 1876 and they had four sons [1] and, on 30 November 1889, a daughter Helene Ragnhild.

Lizzie died on 26 November 1899, aged 45 and Engelhardt raised his youngest children with the help of his mother until her death on 5 December 1902 at the age of 76.

Østby often travelled to Europe to survey the European markets, particularly Paris, and he was always on the look out for developments in both production and design. Beginning in 1906 Engelhart took Helene with him on all his subsequent European business trips. They visited Norway for the first time in 1907, returning with a Norwegian Goats cheese - a family tradition which would be repeated in 1912. In the middle of January 1912 Engelhart travelled again to Europe, he needed a vacation, and again Helene accompanied him. They travelled around Southern Europe and Egypt and while at Nice, France they first heard about the possibility of returning to America on the Titanic. They journeyed on to Paris where they met Frank and Anna Warren whom they had previously met in Egypt. The Warrens already had their ticket for the Titanic.

Engelhart paid £62 for their tickets, according to White Star their last address was c/o Brown Shipley, Pall Mall, London SW. so perhaps they had also visited England. However, it was at the french port of Cherbourg that they boarded the Titanic in first class, Engelhart occupying cabin B-30 and Helene B-36. Engelhart carried with him his old doctor's bag he always used when travelling. In it he had gems, precious stones and other valuables that he had bought in Paris.

On the night of the disaster Engelhart and Helene sat in the reception room, they talked with Mr and Mrs Warren and listened to the orchestra. At around 10 p.m. Mr and Mrs Warren decided to take a stroll on deck but it was too cold so they all went to bed.

After the collision Engelhart met his daughter in the corridor that separated their staterooms. Together with the Warrens, they climbed the grand staircase to the Boat Deck. Leaving Helene and the others close to lifeboat 5 Engelhart returned to their staterooms to get some warmer clothes but in the meantime Helene had boarded the lifeboat and they never saw each other again.

Engelhart's body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#234).

NO. 234. - MALE. - ESTIMATED AGE, 52. - HAIR, FAIR.

EFFECTS - Gold filled teeth; gold watch and chain; knife: glasses; diary; two pocket books and papers.

FIRST CLASS. - NAME - ENGELHART C. OSTBY.

The embalmed body was identified in Halifax by an employee of Ostby & Barton, David Sutherland; he brought the coffin to Rhode Island and it was buried on 11 May 1912 (3 May?) at Swan Point, Providence. The paper Svea wrote on 15 May that: "The body was laid in a sealed metal coffin placed into a valuable mahogany coffin. The flower tribute was enormous, even when a note had been circulated not to send any flowers." When helen died in 1978 she was buried close to her father.


© Michael A.Findlay, USA

The family sought compensation from the White Star Line for their loss. Harold Ostby claimed 840,000 N.Kr. (Norwegian Kroner) for loss off life and Helene claimed 5,376 N.Kr. for loss of property, and 33,600 N.Kr. for loss of property and damage.

Engelhardt left a 14 page will bequeathing his estate to his children along with separate bequests to his brother Arthur, his sister Constance J. Coles of Brooklyn, NY and her daughter Elizabeth Coles. Some years later he added codicils to the will which revoked the bequests to Arthur Ostby and Elizabeth Coles but left intact his bequest of a homeplace in Brooklyn to his sister Constance. Present day descendants live in Providence, R.I., New Haven, Connecticut, and Garland, Texas.

Notes
1. Harold Webster, born 19 March 1877, later married Elizabeth.
Erling Cornelius, born 13 October 1880, married Annie H. Brown on 7 November 1906.
Ralph Granville, born 8 May 1882, married Dorothy Bucklin (18 May 1888-May 1978) on 10 January 1912.
Raymond Engelhart, born 12 January 1884, married Alice L. Howard on 30 April 1917.

References and Sources

State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Certificate Of Death
Per Kristian Sebak (1998) Titanic: 31 Norske Skjebner, Genesis Publishers
The Providence Sunday Journal, January 1998
The Manufacturing Jeweler, 1912
The Rhode Island Sunday Magazine, 15 April 1962
Svea,15 May 1912
Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996, 1999) Titanic. Prisma, Stockholm. ISBN 91 518 3644 0

Credits
Philip Hind (Editor)
Leif Snellman, Finland
Phillip Gowan, USA
Per Kristian Sebak, Norway
Lisa Waller, USA

Related Articles and Documents

Gravestone
GRAVESTONE  
OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE The Evening News  (1912)  OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE  
The Ostby mansion on Cooke Street, Providence (2003)  THE OSTBY MANSION ON COOKE STREET, PROVIDENCE  
Several interview excerpts by Helen and family details Providence Journal  (2005)  SEVERAL INTERVIEW EXCERPTS BY HELEN AND FAMILY DETAILS  

Titanic Passenger and Crew Summary

Name: Mr Engelhart Cornelius Ostby
Born: Saturday 18th December 1847
Age: 64 years 3 months and 28 days.
Last Residence: in Providence Rhode Island United States
Occupation: Jeweller

First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1912
Ticket No. 113509 , £61 19s 7d
Cabin No.: B30
Destination: Providence Rhode Island United States
Died in the Titanic disaster (15th April 1912).
Body recovered by: Mackay-Bennett (No. 234)
Buried: Swan Point Cemetery Providence Rhode Island United States on Saturday 11th May 1912.

Travelling Companions (on same ticket)
Miss Helen Ragnhild Ostby


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Please link to this page using the following URL
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If you need to cite this article as a reference please copy the following and adapt as necessary for your referencing system:

(2013) Engelhart Cornelius Ostby Encyclopedia Titanica (ref: #223, accessed 7th June 2013 08:58:47 PM)
URL : http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html

- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.5HLfq22i.dpuf

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

In addition to his jewellery business Østby was a director of the High Street Bank and the Industrial Trust Company, and a trustee of the Citizens Savings Bank; all of which were in Providence. Østby became well known in the city both for his success in business and for his many charitable acts.

Engelhart Østby was married to Lizzy Macy Webster (born 1854) on 7 June 1876 and they had four sons [1] and, on 30 November 1889, a daughter Helene Ragnhild.

Lizzie died on 26 November 1899, aged 45 and Engelhardt raised his youngest children with the help of his mother until her death on 5 December 1902 at the age of 76.

Østby often travelled to Europe to survey the European markets, particularly Paris, and he was always on the look out for developments in both production and design. Beginning in 1906 Engelhart took Helene with him on all his subsequent European business trips. They visited Norway for the first time in 1907, returning with a Norwegian Goats cheese - a family tradition which would be repeated in 1912. In the middle of January 1912 Engelhart travelled again to Europe, he needed a vacation, and again Helene accompanied him. They travelled around Southern Europe and Egypt and while at Nice, France they first heard about the possibility of returning to America on the Titanic. They journeyed on to Paris where they met Frank and Anna Warren whom they had previously met in Egypt. The Warrens already had their ticket for the Titanic.

Engelhart paid £62 for their tickets, according to White Star their last address was c/o Brown Shipley, Pall Mall, London SW. so perhaps they had also visited England. However, it was at the french port of Cherbourg that they boarded the Titanic in first class, Engelhart occupying cabin B-30 and Helene B-36. Engelhart carried with him his old doctor's bag he always used when travelling. In it he had gems, precious stones and other valuables that he had bought in Paris.

On the night of the disaster Engelhart and Helene sat in the reception room, they talked with Mr and Mrs Warren and listened to the orchestra. At around 10 p.m. Mr and Mrs Warren decided to take a stroll on deck but it was too cold so they all went to bed.

After the collision Engelhart met his daughter in the corridor that separated their staterooms. Together with the Warrens, they climbed the grand staircase to the Boat Deck. Leaving Helene and the others close to lifeboat 5 Engelhart returned to their staterooms to get some warmer clothes but in the meantime Helene had boarded the lifeboat and they never saw each other again.

Engelhart's body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#234).

NO. 234. - MALE. - ESTIMATED AGE, 52. - HAIR, FAIR.

EFFECTS - Gold filled teeth; gold watch and chain; knife: glasses; diary; two pocket books and papers.

FIRST CLASS. - NAME - ENGELHART C. OSTBY.

The embalmed body was identified in Halifax by an employee of Ostby & Barton, David Sutherland; he brought the coffin to Rhode Island and it was buried on 11 May 1912 (3 May?) at Swan Point, Providence. The paper Svea wrote on 15 May that: "The body was laid in a sealed metal coffin placed into a valuable mahogany coffin. The flower tribute was enormous, even when a note had been circulated not to send any flowers." When helen died in 1978 she was buried close to her father.


© Michael A.Findlay, USA

The family sought compensation from the White Star Line for their loss. Harold Ostby claimed 840,000 N.Kr. (Norwegian Kroner) for loss off life and Helene claimed 5,376 N.Kr. for loss of property, and 33,600 N.Kr. for loss of property and damage.

Engelhardt left a 14 page will bequeathing his estate to his children along with separate bequests to his brother Arthur, his sister Constance J. Coles of Brooklyn, NY and her daughter Elizabeth Coles. Some years later he added codicils to the will which revoked the bequests to Arthur Ostby and Elizabeth Coles but left intact his bequest of a homeplace in Brooklyn to his sister Constance. Present day descendants live in Providence, R.I., New Haven, Connecticut, and Garland, Texas.

Notes
1. Harold Webster, born 19 March 1877, later married Elizabeth.
Erling Cornelius, born 13 October 1880, married Annie H. Brown on 7 November 1906.
Ralph Granville, born 8 May 1882, married Dorothy Bucklin (18 May 1888-May 1978) on 10 January 1912.
Raymond Engelhart, born 12 January 1884, married Alice L. Howard on 30 April 1917.

References and Sources

State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Certificate Of Death
Per Kristian Sebak (1998) Titanic: 31 Norske Skjebner, Genesis Publishers
The Providence Sunday Journal, January 1998
The Manufacturing Jeweler, 1912
The Rhode Island Sunday Magazine, 15 April 1962
Svea,15 May 1912
Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996, 1999) Titanic. Prisma, Stockholm. ISBN 91 518 3644 0

Credits
Philip Hind (Editor)
Leif Snellman, Finland
Phillip Gowan, USA
Per Kristian Sebak, Norway
Lisa Waller, USA

Related Articles and Documents

Gravestone
GRAVESTONE  
OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE The Evening News  (1912)  OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE  
The Ostby mansion on Cooke Street, Providence (2003)  THE OSTBY MANSION ON COOKE STREET, PROVIDENCE  
Several interview excerpts by Helen and family details Providence Journal  (2005)  SEVERAL INTERVIEW EXCERPTS BY HELEN AND FAMILY DETAILS  

Titanic Passenger and Crew Summary

Name: Mr Engelhart Cornelius Ostby
Born: Saturday 18th December 1847
Age: 64 years 3 months and 28 days.
Last Residence: in Providence Rhode Island United States
Occupation: Jeweller

First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1912
Ticket No. 113509 , £61 19s 7d
Cabin No.: B30
Destination: Providence Rhode Island United States
Died in the Titanic disaster (15th April 1912).
Body recovered by: Mackay-Bennett (No. 234)
Buried: Swan Point Cemetery Providence Rhode Island United States on Saturday 11th May 1912.

Travelling Companions (on same ticket)
Miss Helen Ragnhild Ostby


Contact us if you have new information.

Search now for more on Engelhart Cornelius Ostby

Join our group on Facebook for the latest discoveries.

Link to this page
Please link to this page using the following URL
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html

Or copy the link text below

Cite this page
If you need to cite this article as a reference please copy the following and adapt as necessary for your referencing system:

(2013) Engelhart Cornelius Ostby Encyclopedia Titanica (ref: #223, accessed 7th June 2013 08:58:47 PM)
URL : http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html

- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Ostby

 1538  154  2  0  17

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

In addition to his jewellery business Østby was a director of the High Street Bank and the Industrial Trust Company, and a trustee of the Citizens Savings Bank; all of which were in Providence. Østby became well known in the city both for his success in business and for his many charitable acts.

Engelhart Østby was married to Lizzy Macy Webster (born 1854) on 7 June 1876 and they had four sons [1] and, on 30 November 1889, a daughter Helene Ragnhild.

Lizzie died on 26 November 1899, aged 45 and Engelhardt raised his youngest children with the help of his mother until her death on 5 December 1902 at the age of 76.

Østby often travelled to Europe to survey the European markets, particularly Paris, and he was always on the look out for developments in both production and design. Beginning in 1906 Engelhart took Helene with him on all his subsequent European business trips. They visited Norway for the first time in 1907, returning with a Norwegian Goats cheese - a family tradition which would be repeated in 1912. In the middle of January 1912 Engelhart travelled again to Europe, he needed a vacation, and again Helene accompanied him. They travelled around Southern Europe and Egypt and while at Nice, France they first heard about the possibility of returning to America on the Titanic. They journeyed on to Paris where they met Frank and Anna Warren whom they had previously met in Egypt. The Warrens already had their ticket for the Titanic.

Engelhart paid £62 for their tickets, according to White Star their last address was c/o Brown Shipley, Pall Mall, London SW. so perhaps they had also visited England. However, it was at the french port of Cherbourg that they boarded the Titanic in first class, Engelhart occupying cabin B-30 and Helene B-36. Engelhart carried with him his old doctor's bag he always used when travelling. In it he had gems, precious stones and other valuables that he had bought in Paris.

On the night of the disaster Engelhart and Helene sat in the reception room, they talked with Mr and Mrs Warren and listened to the orchestra. At around 10 p.m. Mr and Mrs Warren decided to take a stroll on deck but it was too cold so they all went to bed.

After the collision Engelhart met his daughter in the corridor that separated their staterooms. Together with the Warrens, they climbed the grand staircase to the Boat Deck. Leaving Helene and the others close to lifeboat 5 Engelhart returned to their staterooms to get some warmer clothes but in the meantime Helene had boarded the lifeboat and they never saw each other again.

Engelhart's body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#234).

NO. 234. - MALE. - ESTIMATED AGE, 52. - HAIR, FAIR.

EFFECTS - Gold filled teeth; gold watch and chain; knife: glasses; diary; two pocket books and papers.

FIRST CLASS. - NAME - ENGELHART C. OSTBY.

The embalmed body was identified in Halifax by an employee of Ostby & Barton, David Sutherland; he brought the coffin to Rhode Island and it was buried on 11 May 1912 (3 May?) at Swan Point, Providence. The paper Svea wrote on 15 May that: "The body was laid in a sealed metal coffin placed into a valuable mahogany coffin. The flower tribute was enormous, even when a note had been circulated not to send any flowers." When helen died in 1978 she was buried close to her father.


© Michael A.Findlay, USA

The family sought compensation from the White Star Line for their loss. Harold Ostby claimed 840,000 N.Kr. (Norwegian Kroner) for loss off life and Helene claimed 5,376 N.Kr. for loss of property, and 33,600 N.Kr. for loss of property and damage.

Engelhardt left a 14 page will bequeathing his estate to his children along with separate bequests to his brother Arthur, his sister Constance J. Coles of Brooklyn, NY and her daughter Elizabeth Coles. Some years later he added codicils to the will which revoked the bequests to Arthur Ostby and Elizabeth Coles but left intact his bequest of a homeplace in Brooklyn to his sister Constance. Present day descendants live in Providence, R.I., New Haven, Connecticut, and Garland, Texas.

Notes
1. Harold Webster, born 19 March 1877, later married Elizabeth.
Erling Cornelius, born 13 October 1880, married Annie H. Brown on 7 November 1906.
Ralph Granville, born 8 May 1882, married Dorothy Bucklin (18 May 1888-May 1978) on 10 January 1912.
Raymond Engelhart, born 12 January 1884, married Alice L. Howard on 30 April 1917.

References and Sources

State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Certificate Of Death
Per Kristian Sebak (1998) Titanic: 31 Norske Skjebner, Genesis Publishers
The Providence Sunday Journal, January 1998
The Manufacturing Jeweler, 1912
The Rhode Island Sunday Magazine, 15 April 1962
Svea,15 May 1912
Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996, 1999) Titanic. Prisma, Stockholm. ISBN 91 518 3644 0

Credits
Philip Hind (Editor)
Leif Snellman, Finland
Phillip Gowan, USA
Per Kristian Sebak, Norway
Lisa Waller, USA
- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf

 

 1538  154  2  0  17

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

In addition to his jewellery business Østby was a director of the High Street Bank and the Industrial Trust Company, and a trustee of the Citizens Savings Bank; all of which were in Providence. Østby became well known in the city both for his success in business and for his many charitable acts.

Engelhart Østby was married to Lizzy Macy Webster (born 1854) on 7 June 1876 and they had four sons [1] and, on 30 November 1889, a daughter Helene Ragnhild.

Lizzie died on 26 November 1899, aged 45 and Engelhardt raised his youngest children with the help of his mother until her death on 5 December 1902 at the age of 76.

Østby often travelled to Europe to survey the European markets, particularly Paris, and he was always on the look out for developments in both production and design. Beginning in 1906 Engelhart took Helene with him on all his subsequent European business trips. They visited Norway for the first time in 1907, returning with a Norwegian Goats cheese - a family tradition which would be repeated in 1912. In the middle of January 1912 Engelhart travelled again to Europe, he needed a vacation, and again Helene accompanied him. They travelled around Southern Europe and Egypt and while at Nice, France they first heard about the possibility of returning to America on the Titanic. They journeyed on to Paris where they met Frank and Anna Warren whom they had previously met in Egypt. The Warrens already had their ticket for the Titanic.

Engelhart paid £62 for their tickets, according to White Star their last address was c/o Brown Shipley, Pall Mall, London SW. so perhaps they had also visited England. However, it was at the french port of Cherbourg that they boarded the Titanic in first class, Engelhart occupying cabin B-30 and Helene B-36. Engelhart carried with him his old doctor's bag he always used when travelling. In it he had gems, precious stones and other valuables that he had bought in Paris.

On the night of the disaster Engelhart and Helene sat in the reception room, they talked with Mr and Mrs Warren and listened to the orchestra. At around 10 p.m. Mr and Mrs Warren decided to take a stroll on deck but it was too cold so they all went to bed.

After the collision Engelhart met his daughter in the corridor that separated their staterooms. Together with the Warrens, they climbed the grand staircase to the Boat Deck. Leaving Helene and the others close to lifeboat 5 Engelhart returned to their staterooms to get some warmer clothes but in the meantime Helene had boarded the lifeboat and they never saw each other again.

Engelhart's body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#234).

NO. 234. - MALE. - ESTIMATED AGE, 52. - HAIR, FAIR.

EFFECTS - Gold filled teeth; gold watch and chain; knife: glasses; diary; two pocket books and papers.

FIRST CLASS. - NAME - ENGELHART C. OSTBY.

The embalmed body was identified in Halifax by an employee of Ostby & Barton, David Sutherland; he brought the coffin to Rhode Island and it was buried on 11 May 1912 (3 May?) at Swan Point, Providence. The paper Svea wrote on 15 May that: "The body was laid in a sealed metal coffin placed into a valuable mahogany coffin. The flower tribute was enormous, even when a note had been circulated not to send any flowers." When helen died in 1978 she was buried close to her father.


© Michael A.Findlay, USA

The family sought compensation from the White Star Line for their loss. Harold Ostby claimed 840,000 N.Kr. (Norwegian Kroner) for loss off life and Helene claimed 5,376 N.Kr. for loss of property, and 33,600 N.Kr. for loss of property and damage.

Engelhardt left a 14 page will bequeathing his estate to his children along with separate bequests to his brother Arthur, his sister Constance J. Coles of Brooklyn, NY and her daughter Elizabeth Coles. Some years later he added codicils to the will which revoked the bequests to Arthur Ostby and Elizabeth Coles but left intact his bequest of a homeplace in Brooklyn to his sister Constance. Present day descendants live in Providence, R.I., New Haven, Connecticut, and Garland, Texas.

Notes
1. Harold Webster, born 19 March 1877, later married Elizabeth.
Erling Cornelius, born 13 October 1880, married Annie H. Brown on 7 November 1906.
Ralph Granville, born 8 May 1882, married Dorothy Bucklin (18 May 1888-May 1978) on 10 January 1912.
Raymond Engelhart, born 12 January 1884, married Alice L. Howard on 30 April 1917.

References and Sources

State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Certificate Of Death
Per Kristian Sebak (1998) Titanic: 31 Norske Skjebner, Genesis Publishers
The Providence Sunday Journal, January 1998
The Manufacturing Jeweler, 1912
The Rhode Island Sunday Magazine, 15 April 1962
Svea,15 May 1912
Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996, 1999) Titanic. Prisma, Stockholm. ISBN 91 518 3644 0

Credits
Philip Hind (Editor)
Leif Snellman, Finland
Phillip Gowan, USA
Per Kristian Sebak, Norway
Lisa Waller, USA

Related Articles and Documents

Gravestone
GRAVESTONE  
OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE The Evening News  (1912)  OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE  
The Ostby mansion on Cooke Street, Providence (2003)  THE OSTBY MANSION ON COOKE STREET, PROVIDENCE  
Several interview excerpts by Helen and family details Providence Journal  (2005)  SEVERAL INTERVIEW EXCERPTS BY HELEN AND FAMILY DETAILS  

Titanic Passenger and Crew Summary

Name: Mr Engelhart Cornelius Ostby
Born: Saturday 18th December 1847
Age: 64 years 3 months and 28 days.
Last Residence: in Providence Rhode Island United States
Occupation: Jeweller

First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1912
Ticket No. 113509 , £61 19s 7d
Cabin No.: B30
Destination: Providence Rhode Island United States
Died in the Titanic disaster (15th April 1912).
Body recovered by: Mackay-Bennett (No. 234)
Buried: Swan Point Cemetery Providence Rhode Island United States on Saturday 11th May 1912.

Travelling Companions (on same ticket)
Miss Helen Ragnhild Ostby


Contact us if you have new information.

Search now for more on Engelhart Cornelius Ostby

Join our group on Facebook for the latest discoveries.

Link to this page
Please link to this page using the following URL

- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf
 1538  154  2  0  17

Mr Engelhart Cornelius Østby, 65, was born in Christiania (Oslo), Norway, on 18 December 1847, the son of Christian Østby and Josephine Dorothy Paulson. He had several siblings including Alvida (born 1850), Arthur Oscar (born 1858), Ragnhild, Constance (born 1861) and Binie.

Engelhart studied to be a jeweller at the Royal School of Art in his home city. After an education that included six years of apprenticeship he worked as a successful jeweller in Oslo.

In 1866 while he was still studying his parents and one of his brothers emigrated to America. He followed them in 1869 and travelled via New York to Providence, Rhode Island. He worked initially for the firm of Hunt & Owen (G. & S. Owen ?) but soon moved to the firm of Arnold & Webster (Later Arnold & Steere) where he acted as head of design and engraving for nine years.

In 1879 with, capital of about $3000, he formed a partnerhip with Nathan B. Barton to create the business of Østby & Barton. Working from premises at 25 Potter St. (later called Garnet St.) the firm became the world's biggest producer of gold rings. Lack of space forced the company to move from Potter St. to Clifford St. and the Austin factory buildng. Soon outgrowing their new premises they again relocated, to the former factory of the Ladd Watch Case Company on the corner of Richmond St. and Clifford St. the building had to be doubled in size to accomodate the burgeoning business.

In addition to his jewellery business Østby was a director of the High Street Bank and the Industrial Trust Company, and a trustee of the Citizens Savings Bank; all of which were in Providence. Østby became well known in the city both for his success in business and for his many charitable acts.

Engelhart Østby was married to Lizzy Macy Webster (born 1854) on 7 June 1876 and they had four sons [1] and, on 30 November 1889, a daughter Helene Ragnhild.

Lizzie died on 26 November 1899, aged 45 and Engelhardt raised his youngest children with the help of his mother until her death on 5 December 1902 at the age of 76.

Østby often travelled to Europe to survey the European markets, particularly Paris, and he was always on the look out for developments in both production and design. Beginning in 1906 Engelhart took Helene with him on all his subsequent European business trips. They visited Norway for the first time in 1907, returning with a Norwegian Goats cheese - a family tradition which would be repeated in 1912. In the middle of January 1912 Engelhart travelled again to Europe, he needed a vacation, and again Helene accompanied him. They travelled around Southern Europe and Egypt and while at Nice, France they first heard about the possibility of returning to America on the Titanic. They journeyed on to Paris where they met Frank and Anna Warren whom they had previously met in Egypt. The Warrens already had their ticket for the Titanic.

Engelhart paid £62 for their tickets, according to White Star their last address was c/o Brown Shipley, Pall Mall, London SW. so perhaps they had also visited England. However, it was at the french port of Cherbourg that they boarded the Titanic in first class, Engelhart occupying cabin B-30 and Helene B-36. Engelhart carried with him his old doctor's bag he always used when travelling. In it he had gems, precious stones and other valuables that he had bought in Paris.

On the night of the disaster Engelhart and Helene sat in the reception room, they talked with Mr and Mrs Warren and listened to the orchestra. At around 10 p.m. Mr and Mrs Warren decided to take a stroll on deck but it was too cold so they all went to bed.

After the collision Engelhart met his daughter in the corridor that separated their staterooms. Together with the Warrens, they climbed the grand staircase to the Boat Deck. Leaving Helene and the others close to lifeboat 5 Engelhart returned to their staterooms to get some warmer clothes but in the meantime Helene had boarded the lifeboat and they never saw each other again.

Engelhart's body was later recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#234).

NO. 234. - MALE. - ESTIMATED AGE, 52. - HAIR, FAIR.

EFFECTS - Gold filled teeth; gold watch and chain; knife: glasses; diary; two pocket books and papers.

FIRST CLASS. - NAME - ENGELHART C. OSTBY.

The embalmed body was identified in Halifax by an employee of Ostby & Barton, David Sutherland; he brought the coffin to Rhode Island and it was buried on 11 May 1912 (3 May?) at Swan Point, Providence. The paper Svea wrote on 15 May that: "The body was laid in a sealed metal coffin placed into a valuable mahogany coffin. The flower tribute was enormous, even when a note had been circulated not to send any flowers." When helen died in 1978 she was buried close to her father.


© Michael A.Findlay, USA

The family sought compensation from the White Star Line for their loss. Harold Ostby claimed 840,000 N.Kr. (Norwegian Kroner) for loss off life and Helene claimed 5,376 N.Kr. for loss of property, and 33,600 N.Kr. for loss of property and damage.

Engelhardt left a 14 page will bequeathing his estate to his children along with separate bequests to his brother Arthur, his sister Constance J. Coles of Brooklyn, NY and her daughter Elizabeth Coles. Some years later he added codicils to the will which revoked the bequests to Arthur Ostby and Elizabeth Coles but left intact his bequest of a homeplace in Brooklyn to his sister Constance. Present day descendants live in Providence, R.I., New Haven, Connecticut, and Garland, Texas.

Notes
1. Harold Webster, born 19 March 1877, later married Elizabeth.
Erling Cornelius, born 13 October 1880, married Annie H. Brown on 7 November 1906.
Ralph Granville, born 8 May 1882, married Dorothy Bucklin (18 May 1888-May 1978) on 10 January 1912.
Raymond Engelhart, born 12 January 1884, married Alice L. Howard on 30 April 1917.

References and Sources

State Of Rhode Island And Providence Plantations Certificate Of Death
Per Kristian Sebak (1998) Titanic: 31 Norske Skjebner, Genesis Publishers
The Providence Sunday Journal, January 1998
The Manufacturing Jeweler, 1912
The Rhode Island Sunday Magazine, 15 April 1962
Svea,15 May 1912
Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996, 1999) Titanic. Prisma, Stockholm. ISBN 91 518 3644 0

Credits
Philip Hind (Editor)
Leif Snellman, Finland
Phillip Gowan, USA
Per Kristian Sebak, Norway
Lisa Waller, USA

Related Articles and Documents

Gravestone
GRAVESTONE  
OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE The Evening News  (1912)  OSTBYS DECLARED SAFE  
The Ostby mansion on Cooke Street, Providence (2003)  THE OSTBY MANSION ON COOKE STREET, PROVIDENCE  
Several interview excerpts by Helen and family details Providence Journal  (2005)  SEVERAL INTERVIEW EXCERPTS BY HELEN AND FAMILY DETAILS  

Titanic Passenger and Crew Summary

Name: Mr Engelhart Cornelius Ostby
Born: Saturday 18th December 1847
Age: 64 years 3 months and 28 days.
Last Residence: in Providence Rhode Island United States
Occupation: Jeweller

First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1912
Ticket No. 113509 , £61 19s 7d
Cabin No.: B30
Destination: Providence Rhode Island United States
Died in the Titanic disaster (15th April 1912).
Body recovered by: Mackay-Bennett (No. 234)
Buried: Swan Point Cemetery Providence Rhode Island United States on Saturday 11th May 1912.

Travelling Companions (on same ticket)
Miss Helen Ragnhild Ostby


Contact us if you have new information.

Search now for more on Engelhart Cornelius Ostby

Join our group on Facebook for the latest discoveries.

Link to this page
Please link to this page using the following URL

- See more at: http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf
http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-victim/engelhart-cornelius-ostby.html#sthash.3TzYEVOq.dpuf

Not only is it a very attention getting piece but it is also a very very rare and highly sought after piece! Please see pics for more info. Sold as is. Sought after by collectors.

Made by Ostby & Barton. Ostby perished on the Titanic 101 years ago this past April, while his daughter Helen, was one of the few survivors. Great chance to own a piece of history! This is a must have for any Ostby Barton collector! Very interesting history...Google it for a great read.

Payment due within 3 days. I offer combined shipping discount for additional single items won within 3 day period. Limit of 5, paid for in one payment. Additional items are $1. Insurance is mandatory for this item and is included in shipping price, as is delivery confirmation. Seller not responsible for customs fees. Shipping rates are non-negotiable.

Good Luck & Happy Bidding!

Please contact me with any questions.

All ad copy and photos are property of daintykatie or encylopedia titanica and may not be used without written permission.

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Paypal payment only accepted. Payment must be received within 3 days of auction close or item will be relisted and non-paying bidder complaint will be filed with Ebay. Items will be shipped next business day following receipt of payment. I offer multiple shipping on auctions won within 3 day period, depending on weight of parcel. Additional single items ship for only $1! No combined shipping for lots, sets or kits. Shipping fees are non-negotiable.
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